INTERVIEW: Luca Bortolo



Luca Bortolo has kept strong techno patterns and subtle tones more personal and closer to his pure harmonic state. His meticulous approach to sound design has grown exponentially since his last release on Rambla Traxx.


Luca Bortolo works the music with substance and will not hesitate to change the frequencies on the loudest kick drum as he pleases. In his latest work he performs patterns without breaking the rhythm, but creating just the right amount of energy to keep the crowd satisfied. Robert Owens brings a remix from a different perspective.


His latest work is a euphoric psychedelic experience, in which each song takes the listener on his own sound journey, until closing a set that is as experimental as it is intense and addictive, which takes hold of oneself like a sweet poison, while transporting us progressively, as few other producers with some ease are willing to do. Building on the legacy of those who came before him, Luca Bortolo has become a talent whose music will influence generations to come.


We have had the pleasure of speaking with him and this has been the result.


How and when have you been interested in music? And electronic music?


Hi Guys, nice to speak with you!

my love for music was born since I was little, I approached music especially through my parents, who were fans of vinyl and stereo cassettes. Memory takes me back to the age of 8, at the very first vinyl I bought, it was Giorgio Moroder's 'From here to Infinity', and that was the moment when my passion for music started. From the moment I put the record on that old Pioneer, I began to eagerly listen to everything from funky to blues and jazz.


Can you tell us a little about your experience? Where are you from / how did you get into music?


I was born and raised in Rome, one of the most beautiful cities in the world (ehehhe I'm biased)

My passion for electronic music started when I was 15, I was travelling to Holland to spend some time with my cousins, a few days later I ended up at the Dance Parade in Rotterdam. What a wonderful experience!


How is your sound evolving? What artists and genres do you enjoy mixing right now?


It’s very important for me to stay on top on music and sounds, I like searching and finding new sounds, but always with a house / funky / detroit touch. There are many emerging artists that I like to listen to and play their tracks, I am always looking for new emotions and impulses. I like to wander from deep, house, detroit house and funky sounds. Some artists I like and I pass their tracks are DJ Deeon, JR From Dallas, Baaz, Javonntte and many more


How do you feel that your music influences or impacts your listeners?


My music reflects my feeling and my emotional state at that precise moment, I try to convey it in the right and happiest way possible, I am the first that dance like crazy in the dj booth, and I’m sure that this feeling can be shared with the crowd and that they can receive your energy


What projects are you working on right now? What can you tell us about the last work?


Right now I'm working on the next release of my vinyl label Rambla traxx, with 4 tracks including two remixes by Robert Owens, in addition i'm also working on my second album.


Where are you and what have you been doing now?


I'm in my studio making a new track for my next album!!!



Has that sound changed a lot in recent years? What is your musical criteria?


In my opinion the sound hasn't changed so much in recent years, of course trends and music changes, but the the old school basics are always there, no matter what.

My style, my vision is well defined, to mix old school sounds with modern influences, keeping an eye on music and club culture and new trends, but expecially trying to conquer the hart, the mind of the dancers and make them dance till death!


Do you feel safe now to play a more experimental sound?


I really like to experiment, something that I always do is testing my productions during my dj set, I think it is very important to do it in front of an audience and understand if something is being transmitted, emotion, joy, boredom or whatever, you can sort it out only on the dancefloor.


We all know that the digital revolution has affected sales, but has it affected creativity?


The digital revolution was a bit of a double-edged sword, in the sense that it also gave space to young producers to let their music be heard and shared with the world in a simpler way, but on the other hand it was a little negative because there are too many productions out. Finding the good one is a real challenge. On my side I’m very happy to seen exponential growth of the vinyl market.


Can you tell us what your present and future projects are?


Producing, producing producing!!!


BUY